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Maryhill Earns Title As L&Amp;C Trail Site

National park Service presents museum with certification.

Maryhill Museum of Art received National Historic Trail Certification as an official Lewis and Clark Trail Site on Friday.

National Park Service representative Richard Williams, based in Nebraska, presented the certification documents to museum executive director Colleen Schafroth at a special signing ceremony.

To qualify for certification, the museum expanded its Finding Lewis and Clark at Maryhill exhibition and developed a Lewis and Clark Overlook. The exhibition features Native American artifacts comparable to those Lewis and Clark documented and collected from the Columbia River Gorge area.

The overlook is located on a promontory on the southeast side of the museum's gardens and has interpretive panels that include observations written by Clark when the Corps of Discovery was passing through the area during autumn 1805. The panels were funded by the USDA Forest Service.

On April 22, 1806, Lewis and part of the Corps walked across the land where the museum now sits.

"Maryhill has always been known as a Lewis and Clark site and now with the bicentennial commemoration about to begin, this was the appropriate time for us to complete the requirements of certification," said Schafroth.

The museum also has some unusual connections to Lewis and Clark, including the Osage orange trees lining its driveway. Osage orange trees were part of the first shipment of natural history specimens sent to President Jefferson from the Corps.

The bronze sculpture of Maryhill founder Sam Hill, located at the museum's entrance door, was created by Alonzo Lewis, a descendent of Meriwether Lewis.

The museum has some special programs and exhibitions planned for the Commemoration, including one about the Peace Medals presented to Indian leaders by Lewis and Clark.

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