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Lewis &Amp; Clark Lecture Set For April 19 At Maryhill

Native American artist to present slide show

On Saturday, April 19, at 2 p.m., Maryhill Museum of Art will present a slide lecture by noted Native American artist Pat Courtney Gold, a member of the Wasco Nation of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Ore.

The lecture will focus on how the indigenous people interpreted Lewis and Clark. In the presentation, Pat Courtney Gold uses quotes from the journals of Lewis and Clark and shares artifacts and Native stories to illuminate the cultural exchanges between the Columbia River Nations and the Corps of Discovery.

"The United States was only 30 years old at the time," said Gold. "Whereas the indigenous nations had existed for thousands of years. The people of the region had established governments, languages, and cultures."

The Museum also has a Lewis and Clark Overlook located on a promontory on the southeast side of its gardens. It includes interpretive panels that share observations written by Clark when the Corps of Discovery traveled through the area during autumn 1805. The panels were funded by the USDA Forest Service.

"On April 22, 1806, the Corps walked across the land where the Museum now sits," said Colleen Schafroth, executive director. "To honor that event, the Museum presents a related program each year at about this time and this lecture continues that tradition."

The Museum also has some unusual connections to Lewis and Clark, including Osage Orange trees. These trees were among the first natural history specimens sent to President Jefferson from the Corps. They grow along the driveway leading to the museum's Lewis and Clark Overlook and in the picnic grounds. The bronze sculpture of Maryhill Museum founder Sam Hill, located at the entrance door, was created by Alonzo Lewis, a descendent of Meriwether Lewis.

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