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Maryhill Season Opens March 19

Opening day features exhibitions, guest speakers and live music

Maryhill Museum of Art will celebrate its new season on Saturday, March 19, from 1 to 5 p.m.

Visitors can view three new exhibitions, listen to guest speakers, and enjoy live music.

The program will begin at 1 p.m. with a family concert, "Woody's Twenty Grow Big Songs," a journey through the children's music of Woody Guthrie performed by Carl Allen.

Allen performs Guthie's music throughout the region and has provided the musical sound track for three public television specials on the Columbia River, Mt. Rainier, and on newsman Emmett Watson.

The concert complements the featured exhibition, "Photography, Beauty and Change in the Columbia River Gorge from the 1860s to the Present," which brings together an extensive collection of images from private collections and the museum's permanent collection.

This stunning exhibit was curated by Terry Toedtemeier, curator of photography at the Portland Art Museum, and sponsored by the Walter Bailey Foundation with additional support from Sterling Savings Bank. At 3 p.m., visitors may join Toedtemeier for a walk through the exhibition.

Also featured is the exhibit, "Embracing Paper: Three Northwest Artists." This intimately scaled exhibition presents a fascinating look at individual creativity by exploring how artists Adele Hammond and John Maher use paper as a surface to make art on, while Virginia Flynn creates paper cut-outs.

At 2 p.m., visitors are invited to talk with the artists about their work, and in the Eye See Resource Room children can handle color reproductions of historic Columbia River photographs.

The 2005 Outdoor Sculpture Invitational exhibit will also open. It features recent large scale sculptures by eleven contemporary Northwest artists, many of whom will be on hand to talk with visitors.

At 4 p.m., a second concert, "Roll On Columbia: Woody Guthrie and the Columbia River Songs," will be performed by Carl Allen. Both concerts are Inquiring Mind Presentations from Humanities Washington.

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