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Serious Horticultural Pest Found In Gorge

Look for bugs, get trap

The following notice has been released by Dr. Peter Shearer, Oregon State University professor and superintendent of the Mid-Columbia Agricultural Research and Extension Center.

"I have confirmed that a fly recovered from a trap located in Mosier, Ore., was a female spotted wing drosophila (SWD). The fly was collected on May 10, 2010, and is the first SWD capture in the Mid-Columbia region this year."

"Currently we have over 100 traps in the region that are being serviced by scouts hired with special Emergency Funds from the Oregon Legislature. There are many more traps in the field that are being maintained by growers and fieldmen. We will continue to expand and intensify our trapping efforts."

Current information pertaining to SWD manangment can be obtained from area horticulture agents Lynn Long (lynn.long@oregonstate.edu, 541-296-5494) in Wasco County and Steve Castagnoli (steve.castagnoli@oregonstate.edu, 541-386-3343) in Hood River County or the Oregon State University SWD website: http://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu.

Domestically, the Spotted Wing Drosophila was first identified in California in 2008. Horicultural scientists and fruit growers are concerned about the rapid spread of this fruit fly and its potential to cause devastating crop losses.

Unlike the common fruit fly that lays its eggs in ripe or overripe fruit, the SWD lays eggs in fruit just beginning to ripen. The larvae hatch and begin feeding on the interior fruit, turning it to a jelly-like consistency and unfit for marketing or consumption.

Fruits favored by the SWD are cherries, peaches, plums, prunes, apricots, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries.

For information on how to make a monitoring trap, identify a SWD and control this pest, refer to the website above or contact your local extension office.

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