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A New Season At Maryhil Museum

Much to look forward to

There is much to look forward to as Maryhill Museum of Art re-opens March 15 for the 2012 season, including an historic expansion and full schedule of stimulating exhibitions and public programs.

After more than a year of construction, the new Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing will open to the public this spring. The $10 million Stevenson Wing represents the largest cultural capital project in the Columbia River Gorge in 15 years and is the first expansion in the museum's history.

It will add 25,000 square feet of space for education programs and collections storage, along with a new cafe, and an outdoor plaza featuring the museum's growing collection of large-scale sculpture.

The museum's 2012 special exhibition schedule will open with "Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians," held over due to popular demand. The season is capped by an exhibition of etchings by the renowned artist David Hockney.

A complete list of events, including the formal dedication of the Stevenson Wing on May 12-13, 2012, can be found online at http://www.maryhillmuseum.org/Press/2012ExhibitsEvents.pdf.

In addition to ongoing permanent exhibitions featuring works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d'art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, the renowned Theatre de la Mode, and American Indian art, Maryhill Museum of Art's 2012 special exhibition schedule is as follows:

Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians -- March 15 to May 28.

Between 1900 and the late 1950s, three photographers -- Lee Moorhouse, Thomas H. Rutter and J.W. Thompson -- captured nearly 6,000 images of Indian life along this section of river. "Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians" presents 40 of their photographs and select examples of regional American Indian art.

Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition -- May 12 to Oct. 7

Maryhill Museum of Art has presented exhibitions of outdoor sculpture annually since 1996. In 2012, four sculptors will loan works to complement the 12 sculptures that make up the museum's permanent collection. The borrowed works will be located throughout the museum grounds and provide a dramatic outdoor art experience.

The Subject is Light: The Henry and Sharon Martin Collection of Contemporary Realist Paintings -- June 9 to Sept. 3

This exhibition features 23 paintings by living artists of Cape Cod, all drawn from the collection of Henry and Sharon Martin. Many of the artists included have ties to R.H. Ives Gammell, an influential artist with a close connection to the first director and curator at Maryhill Museum of Art, Clifford Dolph. Gammell had a passionate belief in representational art and influenced the work of such artists as Robert Hunter, Pam Pindell, Joe McGurl and Jacob Collins, who are all featured in this exhibition. The Martins began collecting art more than 30 years ago, amassing an important collection of Hudson River School works before turning their attention to living artists.

David Hockney: Six Fairy Tales -- Sept. 15 to Nov. 15

In 1970, David Hockney, one of the leading artists of the 20th century, and Petersburg Press released Six Fairy Tales, a compilation of 39 etchings and the texts of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's fairy tales, including: The Little Sea Hare, Fundevogel, Rapunzel, The Boy Who Left Home to Learn Fear, Old Rinkrank, and Rumpelstilzchen. Rather than illustrating the stories literally, Hockney gave the illustrations his own interpretation, creating vivid images to encapsulate moods and details.

During the 2012 season, the Stevenson Wing will feature two intimate exhibitions of objects drawn from the museum's permanent collection. These are:

British Painting from the Permanent Collection -- through Nov. 15

Nineteenth-century British painting from the museum's permanent collection.

Ceramics from the Permanent Collection -- through Nov. 15

Romanian folk pottery and other ceramic items from the ancient world to modern times.

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