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Roundup Of Arts And Letters Aug. 29

Wasco Courthouse closing for the season

The Original Wasco County Courthouse will close for the season at the end of August. The last scheduled days are Aug. 29, 30, 31 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and during the Chamber of Commerce Barbeque from 5 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 29.

After those dates the historic building at 410 W. 2nd Place will be open by appointment only through the end of May 2014, with the following exceptions: Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Dec. 5 from noon to 4 p.m.

Collection of fiber arts showing in The Dalles

Columbia Fibers Guild invites the public to see "Threads to New Worlds---A Collection of Fiber Arts.” The exhibit opens Sept. 3 at The Dalles Art Center, 220 E 4th St. The show juried by Nancy Hoskins of Eugene contains 30 pieces plus display pieces of fiber art, created by 24 artists.

The exhibit can be viewed through Sept. 28.

An opening reception will be held Sept. 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. with Debra Jones as hostess.

Weaving Guilds of Oregon (WeGO), was formed as a statewide organization in 1982, to share information, resources, education and promote fiber art throughout the state, and every 3 to 5 years, the Weaving Guilds of Oregon, (WeGO) sponsor a year-long traveling exhibit of fiber arts.

Today's fiber artists continue to pursue the ancient art of weaving: Making wool yarn into rugs, silk and the new synthetic fibers into scarves and garments; cotton and recycled fibers and items into wall hangings and other items specially designed by the artists.

Plein Air comes to Gorge in September

This September, Columbia Art Gallery will host the ninth annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air exhibition and competition.

At the heart of the event is a five-day Paint-Out and Write-Out where works of art and writing are created at various beautiful outdoor locations in and around the Columbia River Gorge – the nation’s first designated National Scenic Area.

A Preview Party will be held on First Friday at the Columbia Center for the Arts on Sept. 6 from 4 to 6 p.m. It will be followed by an open reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

“It’s no surprise that each year more artists enter the competition and more writers participate,” said Columbia Center for the Arts Gallery Manager, Caroline Mead. “The Columbia River Gorge is a perfect venue for Plein Air.”

This year, acclaimed Plein Air painter Becky Joy will serve as juror. The top prizes will be announced during the First Friday event.

For more information, call Columbia Center for the Arts at 541-387-8877 or visit www.columbiaarts.org.

Country music highlights Kiwanis steak feed

The Dufur Boys will present an evening of country music at the Kiwanis Steak Feed which takes place Thursday, Sept. 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Sorosis Park in The Dalles.

The annual event is The Dalles Kiwanis Club's major fund-raiser for community projects, most of which serve children and youth.

Adult meals include a ten ounce ribeye steak, baked potato, coleslaw, roll, dessert and drink for $15. Free meal for children 12 and under features a hot dog plus the other entrees.

Tickets may be purchased in the park Sept. 5. ###

Tickets on sale now for Cemetery Tales

The fifth annual “Cemetery Tales” will be held on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 27-29, at Idlewild Cemetery in Hood River.

There will multiple performances each day/evening – limit of 15 people per time slot.

Check-in and staging takes place at the Hood River Valley Adult Center, 2010 Sterling Place, Hood River.

Tickets are $15 per person for general admission or $12 per person for museum members and group time blocks of 15.

An additional option includes a $9 Lasagna dinner on Friday and Saturday evening with proceeds to benefit Meals on Wheels. Tickets can be purchased through The History Museum. Dinner includes lasagna, salad, garlic bread and peach-berry cobbler.

Tickets can be ordered on-line at www.co.hood-river.or.us/museum. Tickets can also be purchased by calling the museum office at 541-386-6772.

This is the fifth year for this very popular fall event. The event has sold out each year so get your tickets early.

Since this event is an outdoor performance (rain or shine), the museum encourages patrons to keep this in mind when selecting what to wear. Always bring a jacket and sturdy walking shoes. This year’s performance is a few weeks later than in the past, so the evening temperature will be quite cool. Dress warm so you can enjoy the program in comfort.

This event is not designed for children under the age of 10 due to the format of the performance.

The performance style is unique as each guest begins their Cemetery Tales journey by bus which takes them from the Hood River Valley Adult Center, into the cemetery and then drops them at the starting location. The groups are then guided from graveside to graveside by an experienced volunteer, following a path of hundreds of luminaries. Once at a graveside station, guests are seated and then treated to a very intimate and personal look at the lives of the person buried there. Cemetery Tales is more than a program about dates and locations; it’s an intimate journey into the lives of these unique people.

The purpose of this event is to utilize first person dramatic monologues to engage and connect with the stories of community members that have passed on before us. This style of performance allows you to experience our community’s history in a very personal way.

“Many people don’t realize the preparation and planning that goes into the seemingly effortless success of Cemetery Tales. We begin working on the next year’s performance in October (just a few weeks after the actual performance dates). We start by selecting story options from throughout the cemetery and then we go back to the museums research files to start fine tuning that list,” said museum coordinator Connie Nice.

Once the casting call goes out and organizers see who is interested in acting for this season, museum staff narrow the list down again and being to develop a final cast list. Each actor is then given a packet of research materials to start developing their story outline and eventually their script. The scripts go through multiple revisions, always honing in on telling a story that isn’t just about dates and names – but about life and living. Costumes are then developed, designed, and made.

“The History Museum works hard to have this special community event bring a deeper awareness of the museum and our mission, but also to create an opportunity for people to make a deep connection with the stories of our grandmothers and grandfathers. Despite all the preparation and work that goes into this event, it is my favorite community program that the museum offers and one that I look forward to each year,” said Nice.

This year’s cast include: Emma Morrison Culbertson portrayed by Gabriella Whitehead, this early local family was involved in the beginning of the lumber and fruit industry; Phillip Carroll portrayed by Roger Blashfield. Mr. Carroll had an interesting connection to the Russian famine after WWI and with our 31st President of the United States, Herbert Hoover; Phoebe Koberg portrayed by Julie Jindal, Phoebe will share the story of the Neighbors of Woodcraft Home which was located in what we now know as the Columbia Gorge Hotel in the mid-1950’s; Alva Day portrayed by Aaron Nice; Bessie Henry and Emily Park portrayed by Anne Maguire and Rachel Short, these lifetime friends shunned the traditional domestic calling of Victorian women and advocated for Education rights for all children and eventually they came to Hood River in their later years and purchased an orchard in the Neal Creak area; Jennie Shoemaker portrayed by Kate Dougherty and daughter Keeley Brownback, Jennie headed west with her family on the Oregon Trail when she was three, then the family located in Pendleton and later moved to Hood River, The Shoemaker family grew to one of the most influential families of the early 20th century.

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