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White Salmon Adopts 6-year Transportation Plan

White Salmon City Councilor Amy Martin received a congratulatory handshake from Mayor David Poucher last Wednesday after taking the oath of office before the start of the regular business meeting. Martin is one of three new council members elected last November to 4-year terms.

Photo by Sverre Bakke
White Salmon City Councilor Amy Martin received a congratulatory handshake from Mayor David Poucher last Wednesday after taking the oath of office before the start of the regular business meeting. Martin is one of three new council members elected last November to 4-year terms.



The White Salmon City Council last Wednesday adopted a Six-Year Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the city, for the years 2018-23.

The STIP proposes more than $6 million in street improvements over the next six years, according to Clerk/Treasurer Jan Brending.

White Salmon last updated its STIP in 2015. The STIP is a planning document that’s subject to change from year to year, with the availability of funding being a key driver for some projects.

A staff memo from Brending and City Administrator Pat Munyan explained the council needed to approve a revised STIP to account for 2018’s two street projects and their associated funding sources.

Those two projects will cost an estimated $366,955. The state Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) has granted the city $348,607 to cover a majority of project costs. White Salmon had to adjust its STIP to account for the grant funds and commitment of local matching funds.

With TIB and local matching funds, White Salmon intends to chip seal .26 miles of SE Wyers Street from S 1st Avenue to SE 5th Avenue and reconstruct SE 4th Avenue from E Jewett to SE Oak.

“When applying for grant or loan funds, street projects should be listed on the STIP,” the Jan. 17 staff memo stated. “Project priorities and the year associated with the project can be moved around depending on availability of funding or possible development in a given area that may affect a street project.”

The memo indicated the council will need to adopt a STIP for 2019-24 this June to cover the next six-year cycle.

A top priority in 2019 will be the reconstruction of the W Jewett and Garfield Avenue intersection and installation of a roundabout (turning circle) and crosswalk. The project would be coordinated with the Washington State Department of Transportation, which owns the roadway that would be impacted.

The roundabout would help the city solve an issue with U-turning from the westbound lane of E Jewett to access angled parking on the south side of the street. The estimated cost is $150,000.

The city currently prohibits U-turns in the downtown business corridor and has posted signs to that effect at either end of the district.



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