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WWI Soldiers Being Honored at Stonehenge Memorial Ceremonies

Fourteen Klickitat County soldiers who died during World War I will be recognized on the 100th anniversary of their passing at Stonehenge Memorial throughout the year. The next ceremony will be on March 15 at 10 a.m. (Submitted photo)


Fourteen Klickitat County soldiers who died during World War I will be recognized on the 100th anniversary of their passing at Stonehenge Memorial throughout the year. The next ceremony will be on March 15 at 10 a.m. (Submitted photo)



Stonehenge Memorial was built by Samuel Hill as the nation’s first WWI memorial. It lies at the original Maryhill townsite, three miles east of the Maryhill Museum of Art, just off State Route 14.

The memorial was dedicated in 1918 to the servicemen of Klickitat County, who died in the service of their country during the Great War; it was completed in 1929 and re-dedicated on Memorial Day of that year when 14 local servicemen were honored by having their names placed on the pillars of the Memorial.

Samuel Hill’s crypt is located a short walk southwest of Stonehenge on a bluff overlooking the river.

In 2018, there will be a small memorial ceremony on the 100th anniversary of each of the 14 service men’s deaths. The public is invited to join the Maryhill Museum of Art staff and friends in honoring these men.

The next ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 15. The honoree will be Carl A. Lester, who was working for himself as a Centerville farmer when he registered for the draft in June 1917. He died at Vancouver, most likely while stationed at Vancouver Barracks.

The series of ceremonies will culminate in a larger commemoration on Sunday, Nov. 11, on the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.



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